Identifying My Aircraft

There are many ways to determine the type of aircraft being used on your next flight. Below are some of the most common ways to find your plane type and some helpful hints.

Beware of CodeShares!

Airlines often have agreements with one another to co-market flights. Flights that are code-share have two (or more) flight numbers; one for each airline participating in the code-share. When you book one of these flights, you'll often see Operated by in your itinerary. Whoever the plane is operated by determines which airline's plane will actually be flying the route. For example, you may have booked a United flight that says "Operated by US Airways". If this is the case, you'll want to look at the US Airways menu for your airplane.

Where can I find the aircraft type on Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity, etc.?

Expedia:

  • After you've entered your desired travel dates and times, a list of available flights will appear. Click on the Preview Seat Availability link under your preferred flight.
  • The Seat Map page will open, showing you the available seats on the plane. Place your mouse over the seats to read SeatGuru seat reviews.
  • If SeatGuru reviews are not available, directly under the seatmap is a text summary that details the route, airline, flight number, and airplane type. Match up the airline and plane type with the SeatGuru menu system.
  • If there are multiple of the same plane type in the SeatGuru menu for the airline you are flying, try to match up the seating plans (i.e. exit rows locations, bulkhead locations, or row numbering).

 

 

 

 

Orbitz:

  • After you've entered your desired travel dates and times, a list of available flights will appear. Directly under the route, you'll see the flight number, class of service, plane type, and flight duration. Match up the plane type with the SeatGuru menu system.
  • If there are multiple planes of the same type in the SeatGuru menu for the airline you are flying, try matching up the seating plans (i.e. exit rows locations, bulkhead locations, or row numbering).

 

 

 

 

Travelocity:

  • After you've entered your desired travel dates and times, a list of available flights will appear. Click on the View Seats link under your preferred flight.
  • The Current Seat Availability window will open showing you the available seats on the plane. Directly above the seatmap is a text summary that details the airline, flight number, and plane type. Match up the Airline and Plane Type with the SeatGuru menu system.
  • If there are multiple planes of the same type in the SeatGuru menu for the airline you are flying, try to match up the seating plans (i.e. exit rows locations, bulkhead locations, row numbering).

 

 

 

TripAdvisor:

  • After you've entered your desired travel dates and times, a list of available flights will appear. Click on the Show Details link under your preferred flight.
  • Click on the SeatGuru Reviews link to see not only the aircraft type but a seatmap complete with SeatGuru seat reviews.
  • If the SeatGuru Reviews link is not available, the aircraft type is listed under the flight details for each leg. Match up the Airline and Plane Type with the SeatGuru menu system.
  • If there are multiple planes of the same type in the SeatGuru menu for the airline you are flying, try to match up the seating plans (i.e. exit rows locations, bulkhead locations, row numbering).

 

 

Where can I find my plane type on the airline's website?

Usually, the aircraft type or 3-digit code will display for every available flight the airline provides for your itinerary. Match up the plane type or 3-digit code with the SeatGuru menu system. We place the 3-digit code for each aircraft in parenthesis following the airplane name and model. For example: Frontier Airbus A319 (319).

Another place to look is the Flight Schedule. Most airlines publish a flight schedule that can be viewed online, or downloaded to your computer. Typically the airline will list the 3-digit aircraft type for each flight. Match up the Airline and 3-digit number with the SeatGuru menu.

Still can't find your plane type?

You can always call the airline or your travel agent directly.

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